Why Rudy Davis’ “Francis Schaeffer Cox” Business Cards Cause Others to Want to Dial the Police

On February 19, 2019,  LoneStar1776 published a YouTube video called, Buc-ee’s Is Going To Call Police if You Put More Schaeffer Cox Cards On Their Gas Pumps. In this short 2 minute audio, a woman representing Buc-ee’s in Itaska, Illinois called Rudy Davis to inquire into the origin of LoneStar1776’s Schaeffer Cox business cards which had been left on their gas pumps.

Rudy Davis explained to Buc-cee’s that, “I don’t have any control over that, you realize I do print the business cards and I distribute-, they’re all over the country, but I don’t have any control over what people do with them…even, even if you call the police, I mean I’m just the guy who prints the cards…”.

Rudy Davis is correct that he cannot control where another person leaves these cards. But he incorrectly states his responsibility for the CONTENT of these cards.  In truth, Vista Print is the printer of these cards; not Rudy Davis, – and it was his wife,  Erin Davis, who created the design on Vista Print’s website.  The purpose of these cards is to provide three resources which recipients of the business card can  research, to find out Schaeffer Cox’s version of the events which lead to his incarceration in a federal prison.

Based on the simple fact that the sole phone number on these business cards belongs to Rudy Davis, it is apparent that  these cards are an advertisement for his LoneStar 1776 video channel featuring his prison ministry’s phone calls. Schaeffer Cox is just Davis’ favorite poster child for his roster of self-described American Political Prisoners.  The Buc-cee’s employee called Rudy Davis because his phone number is on the card.

Rudy Davis once again gives Christianity a bad reputation

The caller from Buc-cee’s was under the impression that these cards originated from a Christian church, most likely because Davis had termed  Schaeffer Cox a Christian American Political Prisoner.  When  Davis avoided naming his wife as the creator of the content of these cards, the Buc-cee’s employee wanted to know the identity of the church distributing them.

Although Schaeffer Cox was raised in a Christian family and his father is a pastor, he departed from that path when he entered into the world of sovereign citizen styled militias and purchased illegal weapons and silencers. Rudy Davis is fond of issuing imprecatory prayers commanding destruction and death on anyone who disagrees with his mission of covering over the crimes of the felons he promotes.

Rudy Davis showing off his gun

What are these “resources”?

Regular readers of this blog are probably familiar with FreeSchaefferCox.com, as I had referred to that website in connection with a Schaeffer Cox defamation lawsuit written by attorney Larry Klayman and his nonprofit Freedom Watch, Inc. against BenBella Books and William Fulton.

In another Schaeffer Cox lawsuit filed pro se on February 5, 2018, but terminated on October 5, 2018 when the Plaintiff filed for a voluntary dismissal based on a jurisdiction issue, the defendants named were Terry Dodd, Stitching Trust for Two, Inc., the Estate of Steward Skrill, Maria Rensel, Eberle, Inc., Tami Cali, Ryan Mobly, DMP, Inc. dba Free Schaeffer Cox, Edward Snook dba US Observer, Ron Lee, James E. Leuenberger, and James E. Leuenberger, PC. (Leuenberger is Edward Snook’s attorney, and Ron Lee is a reporter for the US Observer). Those defendants marked in bold represent the two resources, in addition to LoneStar 1776, that are referenced on Rudy Davis’ Schaeffer Cox cards.

In respect to that February 5, 2018 lawsuit,  MadisonRecord.com published an article on March 16, 2018, Alaskan Man Convicted on Conspiracy Charges Sues Individuals Over Money Collected for Legal Defense, written by Noddy A. Fernandez. This article stated that “The plaintiff alleges that ‘there were ongoing efforts from multiple parties to assist’ his legal defense and the defendants intended to take possession of any funds collected by the partnership by fraud.  The plaintiff alleges the defendants used his identity to collect more than $3 million dollars under the false pretense that the money would be used for his legal defense.”

This is awkward, as the go-to resources for background information on Cox are the very same defendants accused of fraud in a Cox lawsuit!  Although Cox dropped his February 5, 2018 lawsuit, he reworked his complaint into a new lawsuit in a different jurisdiction,  naming fewer defendants.

The US Observer is a premier example of  Checkbook Journalism

The US Observer publication is owned by Ed Snook of Grant’s Pass, Oregon. Here is a Justicia.com reference to a complaint which Schaeffer Cox had made regarding Snook.  Ed Snook, for a hefty price, writes “investigative journalist” reports which he publishes in the US Observer to create a one-sided narrative to the liking of his clientele.  These reports are financed by persons who are either accused of crimes or are incarcerated felons, or their supporters.Someone had financed the US Observer to write two articles on The Federal Framing of Schaeffer Cox.

Shown below is Rudy Davis’ recommendation of this article as a “must read”.

From another perspective, let’s consider an interesting November 13, 2010 Bendsource.com article discussing an entirely different party that was in need of laundering their legal narrative, and so they purchased an investigative report from the US Observer.  Written by The Wandering Eye, this article discusses Tami and Kevin Sawyer, who “were high flyers during Bend’s real estate bubble era but were shot down in flames last month when a federal grand jury in Eugene indicted them on 21 criminal counts including wire fraud, bank fraud, money laundering, conspiracy to commit wire fraud and false statements to a financial institution.  They’re also facing civil suits by about 20 former investors in their various business enterprises.”

The Bendsource article continues, “But now a publication called US-Observer is painting the Sawyer’s in a new light- as innocent victims of a vast, sinister conspiracy involving The Bulletin, the FBI, the U. S. Attorney’s Office and, yes, President Barak Obama himself.” The US-Observer article was written by Joseph Snook and Edward Snook, “Investigative Journalists”, and The Wandering Eye notes, “…I need to explain that Edward Snook, who lives in Grants Pass and is the editor of US-Observer, practices checkbook journalismThat means, in his case, that if you’re accused of a crime and you take out your checkbook and write him a check, he’ll write a story “proving” your “innocence.”

And Rudy Davis has no problem with this form of journalism; in fact, you might say that LoneStar1776 is a kindred spirit with the US Observer’s approach to turning the guilty into innocent victims of a vast conspiracy.

A new lawsuit filed by Schaeffer Cox in connection with “Free Schaeffer Cox” fundraising

But let’s see….Francis Schaeffer Cox filed his “reworked” lawsuit in the United States District Court Eastern District of Virginia, Alexandria Division on November 7, 2018 against Eberle Associates, Tami Cali, President/CEO, William D. Griffins, Vice President, and Mike Murray, President Direct Mail Processors, Inc. It has taken awhile, but it looks like Cox was able to make his final installment on the $400 filing fee as of February 5, 2019.

This lawsuit begins, “Plaintiff is the sole principal of Free Schaeffer Cox, because he is in fact the Schaeffer Cox targeted by the fraudulent Free Schaeffer Cox “Project”. The complaint has yet to be served on the defendants; however, as a judgment,  the Plaintiff wants $38,000 for the funds raised on his behalf by the test mailing conducted by the defendants.  In addition Cox desires the entire $3 million dollars raised by the defendants as a result of the direct mail program that was conducted by the defendants on behalf of plaintiff.  And then Cox wants a list of the persons who made donations, and $1 million for the loss of the comfort and society of his supporters.

How many embarrassing legal issues can one discover on a LoneStar1776 “Schaeffer Cox” business card?

Check out all three resources, and you will descend into a deep abyss of sovereign citizen styled militia groups and politics, illegal weapons, threats against government officials, fraud, lies, pseudo Christianity, checkbook journalism,  lawyers that have had  their fair share of Bar complaints…and on and on!  Is it any wonder that a legitimate business would not want these cards distributed on their private property?

UPDATE 2/23/2019:  Bondo77 made an interesting comment today about the fact that there are no Buc-cee’s in Illinois.  The woman caller claimed to be from Itasca, IL.  However, I just checked and there is a gas station called Bucky’s in Itasca, IL. Rudy Davis posted the graphics from the wrong gas station, it would appear.

 

 

 

 

 

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7 thoughts on “Why Rudy Davis’ “Francis Schaeffer Cox” Business Cards Cause Others to Want to Dial the Police

  1. I’ve always been a bit bemused at the name, Francis Schaeffer Cox. I read a couple of Francis Schaeffer’s books and was always impressed at how he could meld lucidity and theology. Years later I became acquainted with his son Frank.

    Frank is very interesting because he was one of the foundational members of the religious right, an activist who helped politicize the evangelical church yet now he deeply regrets his efforts in doing so. For those unfamiliar his relatively short (47 min) video explains him better than I can.

    youtu.be/OT_kUR60I3s

    I shudder in sympathy to think of how Frank Schaeffer would feel if he learned that another child named after his father grew up to be a domestic terrorist.

    • I had read Francis Schaeffer’s writings years ago. No doubt F.S. Cox’s father wanted the highest ideals for his son. It is a sad thing in life that a son which was given many good things in life to enjoy, trampled it all under his feet, and now sits in prison for a good portion of his life.

  2. It would be also interesting to note, that as Francis Cox was raising money for his ‘legal defense”, he has always used a public defender. All his legal costs have been covered by the government, [i.e. we tax payers], his fund raising was just another scam, and in the end he got scammed himself. No tears here from me.

    • I totally agree. Cox spends his time lying about the facts of his case, and raising money based on his fraud. I suppose he wants his millions so that eventually when he gets out, he can live better than those poor saps that had to work for a living. Other frauds took advantage of his fraud, and now he is moaning about it and suing them. Any monies raised on his behalf should be repaid to the taxpayers who house him and provide free legal counsel.

  3. there are no Buc’ees in Illinois. The only one outside of Texas is the newly opened Robertsdale, Alabama location. I have been acquainted with Buc’ees for many years, as they started here where I live, as a customer, vendor, and had family that worked for Beaver.
    Buc’ees prides themselves on their neatness and clean bathrooms. They WOULD react negatively to some idiot leaving business cards on top of gas pumps.
    They would review the video of the pumps and determine who left them and then report them to law enforcement if it became a continuing issue.
    The Buc’ees claim is just more fake victimhood in my opinion. To what end, who knows.

    • Interesting. I will look into that. I had never heard of Buc’cees before, although I lived in Texas for years. I was just repeating what had been stated on the audio. But now you have got me curious.

      • I just checked and Itasca, IL has a Bucky’s gas station. It appears that Rudy Davis has used the logo for Buc-cee’s. I have added an update at the end of the article to note this discrepancy. Thanks Bondo77 for pointing this out!

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